Bhutan Tourism

taktsangWelcome to the land of thunder dragon. Bhutan is a landlocked Kingdom in the eastern Himalayas, which opened its doors to the world only during the 1970s. The unique culture and rich age old traditions preserved by the Bhutanese people are an extraordinary sight the world should experience. Many People view Bhutan as an experiment of sustainable change. This is conveyed by the tourism policy of “high value, low volume”. Even as Bhutan accepts the realities of globalization, the world appreciates the need for humanity to preserve its socio-cultural, environmental and spiritual heritage. Therefore, in Bhutan progress is not measured by Gross Domestic Product but by Gross National Happiness. The Gross National Happiness philosophy of the country which was envisioned by His Majesty the Fourth Druk Gyalpo Jigme Singye Wangchuck, who stated that “Gross National Happiness is more important than the Gross National Product”. For those who know Bhutan it is both a nostalgic effort to preserve the past and an exciting attempt to step into the future.




Bhutan, country of Guru Rinpoche. Apart from the beautiful landscape, the fascitating people and the sightseeing points that take your breath away, there are many places, that words can barely describe. Many high practitioners and Lamas have meditated here, for months and years. In this incredible powerfield many of our buddhist friends feel that they would love to travel at a lower pace but go into more depth whereever they come.

Our spiritual tour is made by buddhist practioners for buddhist practitioners. We show you some very spezial sacred places and make sure that you have the time to understand the place, get the information you would like to get and then have time to meditate. It is a unique experience to meet the local Rinpoches, to come into contact with the nuns and monks living the monasteries and monastic school, to learn more about their way of life and to have the possibility to deepen your own understanding of the enlightened nature of your own mind.

Tours are only organised in small groups , as well as individual tours with a qualified guide. Once a year a ten days meditation retreat is organised under the guidance of a bhutanese Khenpo.

taktsang Taktsang Monastery
Taktsang also known as Tiger's Nest,is a prominent Himalayan Buddhist sacred site and temple complex, located in the cliffside of the upper Paro valley, in Bhutan. A temple complex was first built in 1692, where Guru Padmasambhava is said to have meditated for three years, three months, three weeks, three days and three hours in the 8th century. Padmasambhava is credited with introducing Buddhism to Bhutan and is the tutelary deity of the country. Today, Paro Taktsang is the best known of the thirteen taktsang or "tiger lair" caves in which he meditated.
tango 1 Tango Monastery
Tango Monastery is a Buddhist monastery located 14 kilometres to the north of the capital city of Thimphu in Bhutan, near Cheri Mountain. It was founded by Lama Gyalwa Lhanampa in the 13th century and built in its present form by Tenzin Rabgye, the 4th Temporal Ruler in 1688. In 1616, the Tibetan, Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal, meditated in its cave. The self-emanated form of the wrathful Hayagriva is deified in the monastery. The word 'Tango' in Bhutanese language means “horse head”. This name conforms to the main deity Hayagriva (local name Tandin) deified in the monastery.
cheri monastery Cheri Monastery
A short distance beyond the turn off to Tango Goemba which was build in 1620 by Zhabdrung Ngawang Namgyal and established the first Monk body here. A silver chorten inside the gomba holds the ashes of the Zhabdrungs father. The Monastery serves as the monastic school for study of Buddhist Philosophy, metaphysics, mathematics, poets and many other Buddhist studies. According to legend or history of Bhutan the place was first visited by Padmasambhava in the 8th century. In the 13th century it was visited by Phajo Drugom Zhigpo the Tibetan Lama who first established the Drukpa Kagyu tradition in Bhutan. Zhabdrung spent three years in strict retreat at the monastery and stayed for many years.
dumtse lhakhang Jangtsa Dumgtseg Lhakhang
The temple is notable as it is in the form of a chorten, very rare in Bhutan. It is located on the edge of a hill between the Paro valley and the Dopchari valley, across the bridge from Paro.The Buddhist iconography depicted in the Chorten is considered a unique repository of the Drukpa Kagyu school. According to a local legend, the Lhakhang was built by the saint Thangtong Gyalpo in 1421 (other sources say 1433) to subdue a "serpentine force" that was located at the foundation of the chorten. Another legend says that Lhakhang was built on the head of a demoness. According to a Bhutanese source it was built "on the nose of a hill that loos like a frog in order to counteract Sadag (earth-owning spirit) and Lunyen (powerful naga spirit). It is said that the hill, by which the temple is built, is a black vicious snake moving downwards."
Kyichu Lhakhang Kyichu Lhakhang
Kyichu Lhakhang is a Buddhist temple in Paro. It is one of the oldest monasteries in the country built in the 7th century by the Tibetan King Songsten Gampo. The story goes that a giant demoness lay across the whole area of Tibet and the Himalayas and was preventing the spread of Buddhism.To overcome her, King Songtsen Gampo decided to build 108 temples, which would be placed on all the points of her body. Of these 108 temples, 12 were built by precise plans. Thus, it happened that in about the year AD 638 the temple of Jokhang in Lhasa was built in the very heart of the demoness. This is one of the oldest monasteries in Paro district. There’s a belief that the two orange trees here in Kyichu Lakhang bears fruit throughout the year. The Jowo Temple of Kyichu is one of the oldest temples in Bhutan, originally built in the 7th century by the Tibetan Emperor Songtsän Gampo. It is considered to be one of the 108 border taming temples he built. In the 8th century the temple was visited by Padmasambhava and it is believed he concealed many spiritual treasures here. Je Khenpo Sherab Gyaltshen wrote that during the 12th century the temple was looked after by the Lhapa Kagyu tradition and that during the 13th century it was handed over to a descendant of Phajo Drugom Zhigpo's son Nyima. In his The Nyingma School of Tibetan Buddhism: It's Fundamentals and History, Jigdral Yeshe Dorje (2nd Dudjom Rinpoche) records that the Jowo Temple of Kyichu could not be seen and that Pema Lingpa (1450-1521) uncovered the temple and restored it as it was before.
jambay lhakhang Jambay Lhakhang
Jambay Lhakhang is said to be one of the 108 temples built by the Tibetan King Songtsen Goenpo in 659 AD on a single day to pin down an ogress to earth forever. A supine demoness was causing obstruction to the spread of Buddhism, and the temples were constructed on her body parts that spread across Tibet, Bhutan and the borderlands. The best known of these temples are Kichu in Paro, Jambay Lhakhang in Bumthang and Jokhang in Lhasa, Tibet. Other lesser known temples in Bhutan have been destroyed. The temple of Jambay Lhakhang was later visited by Guru Rinpoche and later restored by Sendhu Raja after Guru restored his life force. During the 8th century, Sendhu Raja who was the king of Bumthang fell ill, and he invited Guru Rinpoche who brought Buddhism to Bhutan to cure him. Guru Rinpoche found out that the King’s illness was caused by the local deities including the powerful Shelging Karpo. Finding the cause of the illness, Guru chased the deities into a cave, and Guru meditated inside the cave for three months. Guru then subdued the deities including the powerful Shelging Karpo and left his body imprint inside the cave, thus giving the name Kurjey (Body Imprint). Beside the Monastery is a tall cypress tree that is believed to have sprouted from the walking stick of Guru Rinpoche.
kurjey lhakhang Kurjey Lhakhang
During the 8th century, Sendhu Raja, who was the king of Bumthang fell ill, and he invited Guru Rinpoche who brought Buddhism to Bhutan to cure him. Guru Rinpoche found out that the King’s illness was caused by the local deities including the powerful Shelging Karpo. Finding the cause of the illness, Guru chased the deities into a cave, and Guru meditated inside the cave for three months. Guru then subdued the deities including the powerful Shelging Karpo and left his body imprint inside the cave, thus giving the name Kurjey (Body Imprint). Beside the Monastery is a tall cypress tree that is believed to have sprouted from the walking stick of Guru Rinpoche.
chimi lhakhang Chimi Lhakhang
Chimi Lhakhang, also known as Chime Lhakhang or Monastery or temple, is a Buddhist monastery in Punakha District, Bhutan.[1] Located near Lobesa, it stands on a round hillock and was built in 1499 by the 14th Drukpa hierarch, Ngawang Choegyel, after the site was blessed by the "Divine Madman" the maverick saint Drukpa Kunley (1455–1529) who built a chorten on the site. In founding the site it is said that Lama Kunley subdued a demon of Dochu La with his “magic thunderbolt of wisdom” and trapped it in a rock at the location close to where the chorten now stands. He was known as the "Mad Saint" or “Divine Madman” for his unorthodox ways of teaching Buddhism by singing, humour and outrageous behaviour, which amounted to being bizarre, shocking and with sexual overtones. He is also the saint who advocated the use of phallus symbols as paintings on walls and as flying carved wooden phalluses on house tops at four corners of the eves. The monastery is the repository of the original wooden symbol of phallus that Kunley brought from Tibet. This wooden phallus is decorated with a silver handle and is used to bless people who visit the monastery on pilgrimage, particularly women seeking blessings to beget children. The tradition at the monastery is to strike pilgrims on the head with a 10-inch (25 cm) wooden phallus (erect penis).Traditionally symbols of an erect penis in Bhutan have been intended to drive away the evil eye and malicious gossip

Meditation Tour

meditationNestled in the heart of the great Himalayan range, the Buddhist kingdom of Bhutan, is one of the world’s most beautiful meditation travel destinations. Often referred to as the last Shangri-la, almost 72% of it under forest cover, high mountain terrain and deep fertile valleys.

Festival Tour

bhutantourThere are many religious festivals. The best known festivals are the Tsechus which are held at different times of the year in different locations. Tsechus are celebrated for three to five days with both monks and laymen taking part in the ritual mask dances.

Cultural Tour

wonderfulBhutan’s traditional culture is alive in its performing arts, such as dance and music, which are an integral part of religious ceremonies and has been passed down for ages. Our Tour package is designed to explore and give immense knowledge and feel about the tradition of Bhutan.

Contact Us

Bhutan:-       00975-17633499

                 

Email: dawatashi0619@gmail.com

Affiliations

tourism council bhutan    abto    bhutan airlinesDrukair Logo Vector